BAMBOO SHADES BLINDS//BAMBOO SHADES BLINDS : INFANT CAR SEAT SHADE : WINDOW BLINDS UK.
(Tue) CANVAS MATERIAL FOR AWNINGS - FOR AWNINGS


Canvas material for awnings - Solair awnings.



Canvas Material For Awnings





canvas material for awnings






    material
  • Denoting or consisting of physical objects rather than the mind or spirit

  • Concerned with physical needs or desires

  • derived from or composed of matter; "the material universe"

  • Concerned with the matter of reasoning, not its form

  • concerned with worldly rather than spiritual interests; "material possessions"; "material wealth"; "material comforts"

  • the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"





    awnings
  • (awning) a canopy made of canvas to shelter people or things from rain or sun

  • An awning or overhang is a secondary covering attached to the exterior wall of a building. It is typically composed of canvas woven of acrylic, cotton or polyester yarn, or vinyl laminated to polyester fabric that is stretched tightly over a light structure of aluminium, iron or steel, possibly

  • (awning) A rooflike cover, usually of canvas, extended over or before any place as a shelter from the sun, rain, or wind; That part of the poop deck which is continued forward beyond the bulkhead of the cabin

  • A sheet of canvas or other material stretched on a frame and used to keep the sun or rain off a storefront, window, doorway, or deck





    canvas
  • Cover with canvas

  • an oil painting on canvas fabric

  • a heavy, closely woven fabric (used for clothing or chairs or sails or tents)

  • canvass: solicit votes from potential voters in an electoral campaign











175 West Broadway Building




175 West Broadway Building





Tribeca, Manhattan

Erected in 1877 for the heirs of the Estate of Jerome B. King to the designs of the Newark architectural firm of Scott & Umbach, the 175 West Broadway Building is an exceptional example of late-nineteenth-century polychromatic brick design. Exemplifying changes in taste during the 1870s which favored brick buildings, its facade presents a striking blend of European-inspired brick design. Among the notable features of the facade are the contrasting stonework which highlights areas of structural stress and creates patterned effects, the unusual corbelled archivolts employing multiple dentil courses, and the extraordinary stepped and bracketed corbelled brick cornice that is without parallel in New York architecture. This small office building was constructed at a time when improved transportation facilities spurred the erection of such new commercial buildings in the area around lower West Broadway. Built as a rental property for the heirs of Jerome B. King, one of the most prominent manufacturers of plaster and cement products in the country, the building was long occupied by Harwood & Son, a successful manufacturer and retailer of awnings and other canvas products.

Built as a small four-story office building, 175 West Broadway is similar to many of the store and 10ft buildings in the TribeCa area in the division of its facade into a cast-iron and brick commercial base and brick upper stories. Here, however, the first story is elevated a few feet above ground level.

In the absence of original plans it is only possible to speculate on this unusual arrangement, though it seems likely that the building'S small size made an above-ground basement desirable. In addition, since 175 West Broadway was an office building, the wood and glass shopfront was probably not used for the display of goods but only for signage and illumination. The articulation of the upper stories is unusually rich, employing both elaborate corbelling and brick and stone pOlychromy in an exceptional design which draws on both German and French sources.

In his dissertation on architectural polychromy of the 1830s, David Van Zanten described arChitectural polychromy as "a general phenomenon embracing the whole of European architecture" through much of the nineteenth century." An interest in polychromy had first developed during the early nineteenth century as European architects began to find evidence that ancient buildings originally had been colored. By the 1830s, the avant-garde were incorporating an increasingly strong palette in their reconstruction drawings of ancient bUildings. As these architects began to produce plans for modern buildings, color became an important element of design. While the first polychromatic designs were executed in stucco and paint, architects soon became concerned about the tendency of these materials to crack and fade.

Experiments were made with enameled panels, notably in connection with J.-\. Hittorfrs SI.

Vincent-de-Paul in Paris (consecrated 1844), but increasingly the solution seemed to lie in structural polychromy, in which color was derived from "the inherent hues of building materials."" One of the leaders in the adoption of structural polychromy was the pre-eminent German architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel who began to produce polychromatic brick designs in the late 1820s, culminating in the red and violet-banded Berlin Bauakadamie (School of Architecture), a major public monument, which became an important prototype for German design." Interestingly, Schinkel drew his inspiration from a variety of 4 sources including the medieval brick architectl're of Germany and Italy and the modern-day utilitarian architecture of industrial Britain. This expansion of interest to include a variety of models which were given equal weight with classical architecture is, of course, one of the chief characteristics of nineteenth-century design.

In Germany, in the 1830s and 1840s, a group of progressive architects like Friedrich Von Gartner and Leo von Klenze created a new style known as the Rundbogenstil which synthesized classical and medieval architecture by drawing on historic precedents in the round-arched Byzantine, Romanesque, and Renaissance styles.'• Buildings in this style were usually executed in brick and locally available stone since these were thought to be more "truthful" materials than stucco and had historically been associated with German architecture. Characteristic features of the Rundbogenstil included the use of pilaster strips and horizontal bands to set off areas of the facade, the employment of elaborate brick corbelling (especially arcuated corbel tables), and the use of molded surrounds to emphasize arched door and window openings. Color remained an important element of design especially in the work of Schinkel's followers, Friedrich Ludwig Persius, Friedrich August Stiiler, August Soller, and in that of the Munich ar











175 West Broadway Building




175 West Broadway Building





175 West Broadway, Tribeca, Manhattan, New York City, United States of America

Tribeca, Manhattan

Erected in 1877 for the heirs of the Estate of Jerome B. King to the designs of the Newark architectural firm of Scott & Umbach, the 175 West Broadway Building is an exceptional example of late-nineteenth-century polychromatic brick design. Exemplifying changes in taste during the 1870s which favored brick buildings, its facade presents a striking blend of European-inspired brick design.

Among the notable features of the facade are the contrasting stonework which highlights areas of structural stress and creates patterned effects, the unusual corbelled archivolts employing multiple dentil courses, and the extraordinary stepped and bracketed corbelled brick cornice that is without parallel in New York architecture. This small office building was constructed at a time when improved transportation facilities spurred the erection of such new commercial buildings in the area around lower West Broadway. Built as a rental property for the heirs of Jerome B. King, one of the most prominent manufacturers of plaster and cement products in the country, the building was long occupied by Harwood & Son, a successful manufacturer and retailer of awnings and other canvas products.

Built as a small four-story office building, 175 West Broadway is similar to many of the store and 10ft buildings in the TribeCa area in the division of its facade into a cast-iron and brick commercial base and brick upper stories. Here, however, the first story is elevated a few feet above ground level.

In the absence of original plans it is only possible to speculate on this unusual arrangement, though it seems likely that the building'S small size made an above-ground basement desirable. In addition, since 175 West Broadway was an office building, the wood and glass shopfront was probably not used for the display of goods but only for signage and illumination. The articulation of the upper stories is unusually rich, employing both elaborate corbelling and brick and stone pOlychromy in an exceptional design which draws on both German and French sources.

In his dissertation on architectural polychromy of the 1830s, David Van Zanten described arChitectural polychromy as "a general phenomenon embracing the whole of European architecture" through much of the nineteenth century." An interest in polychromy had first developed during the early nineteenth century as European architects began to find evidence that ancient buildings originally had been colored. By the 1830s, the avant-garde were incorporating an increasingly strong palette in their reconstruction drawings of ancient bUildings. As these architects began to produce plans for modern buildings, color became an important element of design. While the first polychromatic designs were executed in stucco and paint, architects soon became concerned about the tendency of these materials to crack and fade.

Experiments were made with enameled panels, notably in connection with J.-\. Hittorfrs SI.

Vincent-de-Paul in Paris (consecrated 1844), but increasingly the solution seemed to lie in structural polychromy, in which color was derived from "the inherent hues of building materials."" One of the leaders in the adoption of structural polychromy was the pre-eminent German architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel who began to produce polychromatic brick designs in the late 1820s, culminating in the red and violet-banded Berlin Bauakadamie (School of Architecture), a major public monument, which became an important prototype for German design." Interestingly, Schinkel drew his inspiration from a variety of 4 sources including the medieval brick architectl're of Germany and Italy and the modern-day utilitarian architecture of industrial Britain. This expansion of interest to include a variety of models which were given equal weight with classical architecture is, of course, one of the chief characteristics of nineteenth-century design.

In Germany, in the 1830s and 1840s, a group of progressive architects like Friedrich Von Gartner and Leo von Klenze created a new style known as the Rundbogenstil which synthesized classical and medieval architecture by drawing on historic precedents in the round-arched Byzantine, Romanesque, and Renaissance styles.'

Buildings in this style were usually executed in brick and locally available stone since these were thought to be more "truthful" materials than stucco and had historically been associated with German architecture. Characteristic features of the Rundbogenstil included the use of pilaster strips and horizontal bands to set off areas of the facade, the employment of elaborate brick corbelling (especially arcuated corbel tables), and the use of molded surrounds to emphasize arched door and window openings. Color remained an important element of design especially in the work of Schinkel's followers, Friedrich Lud









canvas material for awnings







See also:

sewing roman shades

design view cellular shades

design your own draperies

shade for window

solar shading

interior paint shades

bali skylight shades



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